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Café & Kosmos
 
 
In a relaxed atmosphere, interesting discussions about current research are now possible with the event series "Café & Kosmos" which started in May 2010. It is organized by the following institutions:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)

Ususally the event take place on the second Tuesday each month at the externer Verweis Vereinsheim, Occamstr. 8, in München. After a short introduction, the audience can ask questions about current topics "from the cosmos".

    externer Verweis Web page of the Café & Kosmos (in German)



 

March 14, 2012



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sun spots

X-ray Satellite
Credit: NASA


What: Café & Kosmos -
Future technology for X-ray telescopes
When: June 12, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: externer Verweis Vereinsheim, Occamstr. 8,
80802 München
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Future technology for X-ray telescopes

with Dr. Anita Winter from the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics

Cosmic X-rays provide us with important information about high-energy events in the universe. The observation of this radiation, however, is tricky. The astronomers not only need to send their instruments into space on satellites but also need powerful telescopes, which consist of numerous mirror shells.

Conventional methods used for manufacturing the mirrors led to a relatively high weight, which is a major disadvantage for a rocket launch. Scientists at MPE therefore are now developing special, light mirrors from glass panes that have significantly less weight per area and thus enable larger collection surfaces. On 12 June, Dr. Anita Winter from the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics will discuss with visitors to the Café & Kosmos about the opportunities and challenges in the exploration of these new technologies.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.
(May 18, 2012)
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March 14, 2012



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sun spots

Sun Spots
Credit: G. Scharmer, Institute for Solar Physics, Stockholm


What: Café & Kosmos -
Is the Sun responsible for climate change?
When: March 14, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: externer Verweis Vereinsheim, Occamstr. 8,
80802 München
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Is the Sun responsible for climate change?

with Dr. Henk Spruit of the Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics

Global warming, the increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, these are things that worry us. The brightness of the Sun is what keeps us warm. Could it be that global warming is actually due to changes in the Sun and not our greenhouse gases? In other words that it is not our fault after all?

We regularly hear in the news about devastating tropical storms, severe winters or unusually warm ones. Are they are on the increase because of global warming? It turns out that insurance companies have interesting things to say about this.

Henk Spruit of the Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics will discuss these thorny questions, illustrating them with recent images of things happening on the Sun. He will present the current knowledge about our central star and how much we understand the processes going on inside it.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.
(February 21, 2012)
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February 8, 2012



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ELT

The ELT


What: Café & Kosmos -
The European Extremely Large Telescope
When: February 8, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: externer Verweis Vereinsheim, Occamstr. 8,
80802 München
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

The European Extremely Large Telescope

with Dr Markus Kissler-Patig, ESO

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) is setting out to build the largest optical telescope ever conceived: the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). This giant, with a primary mirror of 40m diameter, is one of the most ambitious research infrastructures of the next decade, worldwide! Dr Markus Kissler-Patig (ESO), the Project Scientist for the E-ELT, will present the project and its technical challenges. Much of the necessary technology is forefront research, and the complexity of the machine is immense, promising headaches for many engineers over the next decade.

The scientists will discuss with the guests of Café & Kosmos why such a challenge is worthwhile: this observatory will allow ground-breaking discoveries in many fields. For the first time, we will be technically capable of not only detecting, but also characterising habitable planets beyond our solar system. We will also be able to measure directly the expansion of the Universe and learn more about the ominous dark matter and dark energy.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.
(January 25, 2012)
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January 10, 2012



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ATLAS Ereignis

Accelerator experiments


What: Café & Kosmos -
Accelerator experiments: The search for new physics
When: January 10, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: externer Verweis Vereinsheim, Occamstr. 8,
80802 München
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Accelerator experiments: The search for new physics

The Standard Model of particle physics is one of the best tested models in physics. Nevertheless, this model cannot explain all phenomena observed, such as "dark matter" or the fact that there is no antimatter in the universe. Using accelerator experiments, scientists try to recreate the conditions in the early universe and to answer these open questions.

At the Café & Kosmos on 10 January 2012, Professor Jochen Schieck from the Excellence Cluster Universe presents two different accelerator "types" and their collision experiments: the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the new SuperKEKB accelerator, scheduled to start in 2014 at the Japanese research centre KEK. While the experiments at the well-known LHC take place at very high energies, with the "newcomer" SuperKEKB the physicists aim for maximum precision. Jochen Schieck will discuss with the audience why both ways are needed to enlarge our understanding of physics.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.
(January 10, 2012)
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December 21, 2011



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ISS

International Space Station


What: Café & Kosmos -
Plasma Crystal studies on the International Space Station
When: December 21, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: externer Verweis Vereinsheim, Occamstr. 8,
80802 München
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Plasma Crystal studies on the International Space Station

with Dr. Hubertus Thomas (MPE)

For more than ten years, the International Space Station has been in operation as our manned outpost in space. It is one of the largest international cooperations, led by Russia and the US. While the main political force behind it was to overcome the cold war, the ISS now provides excellent opportunities for scientists to study the influence of gravity on humans and for materials sciences. It is also the technological driver for future manned and unmanned missions to space.

Fundamental research on the ISS is carried out in various fields, from medicine to materials science. The first major scientific laboratory was commissioned in a Russian-German cooperation in 2001 by the first permanent crew in operation: the plasma crystal laboratory PKE-Nefedov. While the other ISS partners NASA, ESA and JAXA had to wait for their laboratory modules, with our Russian partners we could accommodate this experiment in the Russian part of ISS and put it into operation. A perfect deal between DLR and ROSCOSMOS made this possible for the German partners, which have only indirect access to resources on the ISS via ESA: Germany was responsible for the design, manufacture and qualification of the laboratory, while Russia took care of the transport and accommodation on the ISS, crew training, organization and execution of the experiments. Scientists from both sides, the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics and the Academy for High Temperatures in Moscow, benefited from this deal because the scientific results were jointly analysed and published.

The plasma crystal research, or more generally the complex plasma research is a relatively young field in existence since 1994, which has grown considerably since then. A plasma is an ionized gas, the fourth and disordered state of matter - the others being solid, liquid and gas. A plasma crystal thus is a contradiction in itself - a crystallization in a normal plasma is not possible. However, if one adds small solid particles with a size of about one thousandth mm (or "dust") the plasma can crystallize. Due to interactions with the free electrons and ions in the plasma, the dust particles get charged with sometimes up to several thousand charges on a single particle. If there are enough charged particles in the plasma, mutual electrostatic repulsion then causes this to be arranged in regular structures. Through this self-organization the particles can then form a liquid or a solid. The special benefit for physicists: individual particles, i.e. individual "atoms" can be tracked, and dynamic processes such as melting or the motion of lattice defects can be investigated directly. This is only possible as the particles are very large and distances in the ordered structures are measured in several tenths of a millimetre - huge for atomic standards. Observation is then possible already by simple microscopy with low magnification.

Since the particles are so large and therefore heavy, gravity plays a major role in the formation of plasma crystals. In ground-based laboratories only small and basically two-dimensional crystals can be studies. Larger systems require zero gravity; the ISS therefore provides perfect conditions. Other possibilities for experiments with zero gravity are given on parabolic flights, the drop tower in Bremen or scientific rocket flights.

PKE-Nefedov was in operation on the ISS until 2005 and is their most successful and profitable experiment scientifically. Since 2006 its successor laboratory PK-3 Plus operates on the ISS, and again provides outstanding results. This will be operated until 2013, when the third generation, the laboratory PK-4, will be commissioned, this time as a cooperation between ESA and ROSCOSMOS on the Columbus module.

In the next Café & Kosmos, Dr. Hubertus Thomas will report on the plasma crystal science and of course the international space station ISS.

Please note the special date for this Café & Kosmos on Wednesday 21. December.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(December 15, 2011)
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November 8, 2011



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supernovae

Supernovae


What: Café & Kosmos -
Supernovae - unravelling the mysteries of the biggest cosmic explosions
When: November 8, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: Vereinsheim, Occamstr. 8,
80802 München
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Supernovae - unravelling the mysteries of the biggest cosmic explosions

Exploding and colliding stars, seen as supernovae and cosmic gamma-ray bursts, produce the brightest and most powerful radiation outbursts in the Universe. Their observation to a distance of billions of light-years gives us information about the accelerated expansion of the cosmos. When a neutron star or a black hole is produced during the explosion, this releases in a very short time more energy than a star such as our Sun produces in its whole lifetime.

On the one hand such an event can be very destructive, but on the other hand there would not be any planets, plants or animals without these cosmic catastrophes. These explosions drive the galactic matter cycle, during which many generations of stars and supernovae form the heavy elements (heavier than helium) before these are - scattered by the stellar explosions into the surrounding universe - being recycled in new stars and planetary systems.

The astrophysicist Hans-Thomas Janka studies the complex, physical processes in supernova explosions with computer models. In the next Café & Kosmos he will talk about the fascination regarding these events, the large challenges represented by the exact modelling of the explosion in three dimensions, and the hopes (and fears) connected with the next stellar explosion in our Milky Way.

The Café & Kosmos series of discussions is organised jointly by ESO, the Excellence Cluster Universe and the Max-Planck Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics. The discussions usually take place on the second Tuesday of each month at Vereinsheim in Munich. After a brief introduction the scientists take questions from the audience and discuss current issues from the cosmos.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(NOvember 4, 2011)
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...

Scintillating calcium-tungstate-crystals as they are used in the CRESST experiment for the direct detection of Dark Matter
Credit: R. Lang/Max-Planck-Institut für Physik


What: Café & Kosmos -
Dark Matter – Particle search underground
When: October 11, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: Vereinsheim, Occamstr. 8,
80802 München
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
Dark Matter – Particle search underground

With Dr. Jean-Côme Lanfranchi, Exzellenzcluster Universe

Even though Dark Matter is invisible and has not been detected directly so far, it dominates the Universe: without this kind of matter observations such as the motion of stars around the centre of galaxies cannot be explained. Some scientists regard Dark Matter as the necessary ingredient for structure formation in the Universe.

The preferred candidates for Dark Matter are weakly interacting, massive particles, or WIMPs for short. Using various experiments and methods, scientists try to detect the Dark Matter particles. Dr. Jean-Côme Lanfranchi from the Exzellence Cluster Universe (TUM) will present one of these experiments: CRESST (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers), which is located in a subterranean laboratory some 1.3 kilometres below the Italian Gran Sasso mountains.

Recently, CRESST recorded signals that caused heated discussions in the research community. Could it really be the elusive WIMPS?

The Café & Kosmos series of discussions is organised jointly by ESO, the Excellence Cluster Universe and the Max-Planck Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics. The discussions usually take place on the second Tuesday of each month at Vereinsheim in Munich. After a brief introduction the scientists take questions from the audience and discuss current issues from the cosmos.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(October 07, 2011)
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...

for full resolution and copyright information click on the image


What: Café & Kosmos -
From ghostly neutrinos to active galactic nuclei: New results from astroparticle physics
When: September 13, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: Vereinsheim, Occamstr. 8,
80802 München
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
From ghostly neutrinos to active galactic nuclei: New results from astroparticle physics

With Dr. Bela Majorovits and Dr. Robert Wagner, Max Planck Institut for Physics

Recent developments in astroparticle physics - this is the main theme for the international conference "Topics on Astroparticle and Underground Physics" (TAUP). Beginning of September, this conference takes place in Munich, where some 350 scientists from all over the world will present the latest observations and results from their work to a large professional audience, covering many fields of modern astro- and particle physics such as cosmology, dark matter, neutrino physics, cosmic rays and gravitational waves. One controversial topic among scientists at the moment are measurements, which could provide the first direct detection of dark matter particles.

Two of the scientific organisers of the TAUP conference will present recent observations and results at the next Café & Kosmos, as well as covering their own research in particle and astrophysics. Thus the audience will receive first-hand information about new findings and can discuss directly with the TAUP experts.

The Café & Kosmos series of discussions is organised jointly by ESO, the Excellence Cluster Universe and the Max-Planck Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics. The discussions usually take place on the second Tuesday of each month at Vereinsheim in Munich. After a brief introduction the scientists take questions from the audience and discuss current issues from the cosmos.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(September 08, 2011)
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quantum mechanics

Copyright: ESO
full resolution available at http://www.eso.org/public/images/potw1108a/


What: Café & Kosmos -
ALMA - a new radio observatory in thin dessert air
When: July 12, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: Occamstr. 8
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
ALMA - a new radio observatory in thin desert air

The exploration of the Universe using radio waves is an exciting research area that has been in continuous development since the mid-20th century. ALMA, a new radio observatory, is being built at an altitude of over 5000 metres in the Atacama Desert in Chile. It will eventually include 66 individual telescopes, working together to collect submillimetre and millimetre radio waves. What are these waves from outer space? Why are they useful for observing the cosmos? Wolfgang Wild, the European ALMA Project Manager from ESO will answer these questions, as well as those from the audience of the Café & Kosmos.

The Café & Kosmos series of discussions is organised jointly by ESO, the Excellence Cluster Universe and the Max-Planck Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics. The discussions usually take place on the second Tuesday of each month at Vereinsheim in Munich. After a brief introduction the scientists take questions from the audience and discuss current issues from the cosmos.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(July 08, 2011)
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quantum mechanics

Exzellencluster Universe;
images: MPG, Universität Mainz


What: Café & Kosmos -
Quantum Mechanics on Earth and in Space
When: June 7, 2011, 19:00
(until approx. 20:30)
Where: Occamstr. 8
(U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
Quantum Mechanics on Earth and in Space

Quantum mechanics is often considered strange and complicated, especially as many people do not see any connection between their everyday experience and the concepts of quantum mechanics. At the next Café & Kosmos on 7. June, Dr. Stefan Kluth from the Max Planck Institute for Physics will discuss this topic and show that quantum mechanics and our everyday life on Earth have more in common, than you might expect. The scientist will also discuss with the visitors the importance of quantum principles to understand astronomical observations.

The Café & Kosmos series of discussions is organised jointly by ESO, the Excellence Cluster Universe and the Max-Planck Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics. The discussions usually take place on the second Tuesday of each month at Vereinsheim in Munich. After a brief introduction the scientists take questions from the audience and discuss current issues from the cosmos.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(JUne 06, 2011)
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Black Hole and disk

Simulated disk around a Black Hole
Picture: Andreas Müller


What: Café & Kosmos -
Black Holes - dark traps in space-time
When: May 10, 2011, 19:00 (until approx. 20:30)
Where: New: Occamstr. 8 (U3 and U6 Münchner Freiheit)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
Black Holes - dark traps in space-time

Black Holes are possibly the most exotic objects in astronomy: There is nothing more compact in the whole universe; how they influence the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies has become apparent only in the past decades. But how can one explain the existence of such extraordinary celestial objects?

These and other interesting questions will be answered in the next Café & Kosmos with the astrophysicist Andreas Müller from the Exzellenzcluster Universe, TU München, who has been studying Black Holes for many years.
For the first time, Café & Kosmos will take place in the Vereinsheim near Münchner Freiheit.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(May 04, 2011)
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NGC 4526

Supernova 1994D in galaxy NGC 4526
Picture: NASA/ESA, The Hubble Key Project Team and The High-Z Supernova Search Team


What: Café & Kosmos -
What is the Universe made of?
When: April 04, 2011, 19:00 (until approx. 20:30)
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
What is the Universe made of?

How can we observe stuff, which we cannot see? How did the elements form? How do we describe the universe and do we know all its components? In the next Café & Kosmos, Bruno Leibundgut from the European Southern Observatory will provide insights into current research topics and will try to answer the questions above as well as further questions from the audience.

The Café & Kosmos series of discussions is organised jointly by ESO, the Excellence Cluster Universe and the Max-Planck Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics. The discussions take place on the first Monday of each month at Café Jasmin in Munich. After a brief introduction the scientists take questions from the audience and discuss current issues from the cosmos.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(April 01, 2011)
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Picture: ESA, HFI and LFI consortia


What: Café & Kosmos -
A look back at cosmic history
When: March 14, 2011, 19:00 (until approx. 20:30)
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
A look back at cosmic history

The first light in the cosmos did not come from stars - it dates back to a time some 380,000 years after the Big Bang, when the matter had cooled enough for the universe to become transparent. The next Café & Kosmos on 14. March 2011 is dedicated to this oldest image of the universe: What does this so called "cosmic microwave background" tell us about the universe as a whole and about structure formation?

Dr. Torsten Enßlin from the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics will present new observational data obtained with the Planck satellite launched in May 2009. The discussion will not only cover the tiny fluctuations in this background radiation but also the many objects - basically everything - situated between us and the background and thus casting a "shadow". At the beginning of January, the Planck collaboration presented a catalogue of 15,000 celestial objects such as galaxy clusters, quasars, radio galaxies, near-by galaxies and galactic dust clouds.

The Café & Kosmos series of discussions is organised jointly by ESO, the Excellence Cluster Universe and the Max-Planck Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics. The discussions take place on the first Monday of each month (in March one week later because of Rosenmontag) at Café Jasmin in Munich. After a brief introduction the scientists take questions from the audience and discuss current issues from the cosmos.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(March 09, 2011)
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Picture: NASA


What: Café & Kosmos -
Dark Energy - why the Universe expands ever faster
When: February 7, 2011, 19:00 (until approx. 20:30)
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the event will be conducted in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
Dark Energy - why the Universe expands ever faster

After Dark Matter in December 2010, the next Café & Kosmos on 7 February 2011 will deal with the second large invisible component of the Universe, Dark Energy. Representing 73 per cent of the whole energy budget, Dark Energy dominates the Universe - also in another respect: It is the driving force behind its accelerated expansion. The discovery that the Universe not only expands but does so ever faster was made in 1998, so fairly recently.

The research of Prof. Stefan Hofmann from the Excellence Cluster Universe tries to answer the question how Dark Energy can be incorporated into existing physical models. Together with the guests in Café & Kosmos the cosmologist will discuss various scenarios: Is it the cosmological constant proposed by Einstein or rather vacuum energy - or do the scientists have to come up with an alternative theory of gravity for physics on large distances?

The Café & Kosmos series of discussions is organised jointly by ESO, the Excellence Cluster Universe and the Max-Planck Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics. The discussions take place on the first Monday of each month at Café Jasmin in Munich. After a brief introduction the scientists take questions from the audience and discuss current issues from the cosmos.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(February 03, 2011)
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Picture: NASA


What: Café & Kosmos -
Myserious Dark Matter
When: December 6, 2010, 19:00 (until approx. 20:30)
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the event will be conducted in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
Myserious Dark Matter: what is the Universe made of?

The Universe contains a dark secret: most of the matter, which we can only indirectly "see" due to its gravitational effect, neither emits or absorbs any light - it is "dark matter". We have good reasons to assume that it is made of a new type of elementary particle, which interacts only very weakly with light and with ordinary matter. For the past 25 years, we have explored different strategies to bring light into this darkness, and to elucidate the nature of the dark matter.
During the next Café & Kosmos, Dr. Georg Raffelt (Max-Planck Institute for Physics) will explain the justifications for the existence of dark matter, discuss candidates from particle physics, and present possible strategies to search experimentally for dark matter.
The Café & Kosmos series of discussions is organised jointly by ESO, the Excellence Cluster Universe and the Max-Planck Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics and Extraterrestrial Physics. The discussions take place on the first Monday of each month at Café Jasmin in Munich. After a brief introduction the scientists take questions from the audience and discuss current issues from the cosmos.

Please note that the Café & Kosmos events take place in German.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(November 02, 2010)
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Picture: MPE


What: Café & Kosmos -
At the heart of our Milky Way
When: November 8, 2010, 19:00 (until approx. 20:30)
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the event will be conducted in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
At the heart of our Milky Way

Astronomers need to be patient: Dr. Stefan Gillessen will explain at the next Café & Kosmos how astrophysicists at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics found a super massive Black Hole at the centre of our galaxy - with the help of 16 years of data. This Black Hole is four million times more massive than our Sun, but it doesn't shine…

During a clear night, you can easily see the star-spangled band of the Milky Way. Its very centre, however, is hidden behind dense gas and dust clouds. Astronomers use modern infrared cameras to penetrate this veil and to observe the stars at the galactic centre. Just as the planets orbit the Sun, these stars orbit an invisible object. Why does this have to be a Black Hole? Why do we think, that all galaxies harbour such gravity monsters? Come to Café & Kosmos to find out!

The Café & Kosmos event series in Munich is organised jointly by the Exzellenzcluster Universe and the Max-Planck-Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics, and Extraterrestrial Physics. The event takes place every first Monday of the month in the Café Jasmin in Munich: After a short introduction, the audience can ask questions about current topics "from the cosmos".

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(November 02, 2010)
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Discussion

Picture:Universe Cluster/Barbara Wankerl


What: Café & Kosmos -
How Large is the Universe?
When: October 4, 2010, 19:00 (until approximately 20:30)
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the event will be conducted in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
How Large is the Universe?

The next Café & Kosmos discussion evening will take place on 4 October 2010. It will deal with the question of the scale in the Universe. We will start with familiar scales: the Sun has a diameter of about 1 million kilometres. But it is only one of about 100 billion stars in our Milky Way, which stretches over a distance of 100 000 light-years. And our home galaxy is just one of many!

During the Café & Kosmos evening, astrophysicist Dr. Wolfram Freudling, from ESO, will discuss large-scale structures in the Universe, where galaxies and galaxy clusters cling like drops of dew to a giant, three-dimensional spider's web. But how can astronomers discover and measure these structures? These and other questions will be answered in the light of frontline scientific research.

The Café & Kosmos event series in Munich is organised jointly by the Exzellenzcluster Universe and the Max-Planck-Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics, and Extraterrestrial Physics. The event takes place every first Monday of the month in the Café Jasmin in Munich: After a short introduction, the audience can ask questions about current topics "from the cosmos".

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(September 30, 2010)
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Picture: A. Griesch, Excellence Cluster Universe


What: Café & Kosmos -
What String-Theorie is teaching us
When: September 6, 2010, 19:00
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the event will be conducted in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
What String-Theorie is teaching us

Café & Kosmos continues: on 6 September 2010 the discussion will deal with the basis structures of the Universe. All known matter consists of Quarks and other elementary particles. But what will we find if we look to even smaller scales?

The string theory supposes that these particles are based on even more fundamental particles: the "strings". This elegant theory allows furthermore to describe all known particles and interacting forces in one consistent framework. Prof. Dr. Ilka Brunner and Dr. Marco Baumgartl (LMU München) will take the visitors on a discovery tour through the world of strings and D-branes.

The Café & Kosmos event series in Munich is organised jointly by the Exzellenzcluster Universe and the Max-Planck-Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics, and Extraterrestrial Physics. The event takes place every first Monday of the month in the Café Jasmin in Munich: After a short introduction, the audience can ask questions about current topics "from the cosmos".

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(August 31, 2010)
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C&K Logo
discussion

Picture: A. Griesch, Excellence Cluster Universe


What: Café & Kosmos -
The Universe from beginning to end: What will happen to us
When: August 2, 2010, 19:00
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the event will be conducted in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
The Universe from beginning to end: What will happen to us

While others break for summer, "Café & Kosmos" continues: on 2nd August 2010 the next discussion session will be about "The Universe from beginning to end: What will happen to us". The astrophysicist Dr. Thomas Boller will explain how the Universe evolved until now and what the cosmologists expect for our future. The main components of the Universe are Dark Matter and Dark Energy - the vacuum as dominating form of energy determines the destiny of the Universe and of life inside it. The scientist from the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics will talk not only about his own observations in high-energy X-rays but also about the plans for the next X-ray satellites eROSITA and IXO.

This will be the third evening of the new event series in Munich initiated by the Exzellenzcluster Universe and the Max-Planck-Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics, and Extraterrestrial Physics. The event takes place every first Monday of the month in the Café Jasmin in Munich: After a short introduction, the audience can ask questions about current topics "from the cosmos". After the first event about the new particle accelerator LHC at CERN and despite the glorious summer weather, almost 40 visitors came to the second evening for a discussion with Dr. Markus Kissler-Patig about planets and potential life outside our solar system.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(July 27 2010)
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C&K Logo
discussion

Picture: A. Griesch, Excellence Cluster Universe


What: Café & Kosmos -
Are we alone in the Universe?
When: July 5, 2010, 19:00
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the event will be conducted in German.

Café & Kosmos
-
Are we alone in the Universe?

Following the successful start of the "Café & Kosmos" discussion sessions end of May, the next event about the question "Are we alone in the Universe? - Planets outside the solar system" will take place on 5 July 2010. In the relaxed atmosphere of a café, the astro-physicist Dr. Markus Kissler-Patig will discuss if and where there might be life outside of Earth. The scientist works at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and manages the project to build the largest optical telescope worldwide, the E-ELT that will commence operations in Chile in 2018.

Café & Kosmos is a new event series in Munich initiated by the Exzellenzcluster Universe and the Max-Planck-Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics, and Extraterrestrial Physics. The event takes place every first Monday of the month in the Café Jasmin in Munich: After a short introduction, the audience can ask questions about current topics "from the cosmos" - such as What are Black Holes? What do we know about Dark Matter? Or What insights do we gain from string theory?

The topic of the first evening on 31 May 2010 was the new particle accelerator LHC at CERN. Every last one of the plush easy chairs of the Café Jasmin was taken as the physicist Dr. Stefan Stonjek explained how the scientists at the LHC and the ATLAS particle detector try to answer fundamental scientific questions. The feedback of the 80 guests was unanimous: They loved the idea to bring science out of the laboratory into a café in the city centre - and "bombarded" the particle physicist with interesting questions.

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(July 5 2010)
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C&K Logo
view

Picture: Universe Cluster/Barbara Wankerl


What: Café & Kosmos -
The Big Bang in a tunnel
When: 31 Mai 2010, 19:00
Where: Café Jasmin, Steinheilstrasse 20
(U2, Theresienstraße)
Entrance free.
Please note that the event will be conducted in German.

Café & Kosmos -
The Big Bang in a tunnel: New event series starts in Munich

In a relaxed atmosphere, interesting discussions about current research are now possible with the new event series "Café amp; Kosmos", which will start on 31st May 2010. The physicist Dr. Stefan Stonjek from the Max Planck Institute for Physics will give a short introduction about "The Big Bang in a tunnel", explaining what is happening in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the new particle accelerator at the CERN research centre in Geneva, Switzerland. This will be followed by an open discussion with the public.

This evening will be the first of the new event series "Café amp; Kosmos", which aims to bring scientists and the lay audience together outside of scientific institutions: in the middle of Munich - and in a Café. This is the place where people meet in pleasant surroundings, chat, discuss big and small issues … and from 31. May once a month also science.

"Café amp; Kosmos" is an initiative of the Exzellenzcluster Universe and the Max-Planck-Institutes for Physics, Astrophysics, and Extraterrestrial Physics.

The second event will take place on 5. July 2010 with the astrophysicist Dr. Markus Kissler-Patig of ESO who will discuss the question "Are we alone in the Universe? - Planets outside the solar system".

Links:

    external link European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    external link Exzellenzcluster Universe
    external link Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA)
    internal link Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
    external link Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP)
(May 26 2010)
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